The Race For A Seat! COGIC Candidates


1 Timothy 3New Revised Standard Version, Anglicised (NRSVA)

Qualifications of Bishops

3 The saying is sure:[a] whoever aspires to the office of bishop[b] desires a noble task. 2 Now a bishop[c] must be above reproach, married only once,[d] temperate, sensible, respectable, hospitable, an apt teacher,3 not a drunkard, not violent but gentle, not quarrelsome, and not a lover of money. 4 He must manage his own household well, keeping his children submissive and respectful in every way— 5 for if someone does not know how to manage his own household, how can he take care of God’s church? 6 He must not be a recent convert, or he may be puffed up with conceit and fall into the condemnation of the devil. 7 Moreover, he must be well thought of by outsiders, so that he may not fall into disgrace and the snare of the devil.

Qualifications of Deacons

8 Deacons likewise must be serious, not double-tongued, not indulging in much wine, not greedy for money; 9 they must hold fast to the mystery of the faith with a clear conscience. 10 And let them first be tested; then, if they prove themselves blameless, let them serve as deacons.11 Women[e] likewise must be serious, not slanderers, but temperate, faithful in all things. 12 Let deacons be married only once,[f] and let them manage their children and their households well; 13 for those who serve well as deacons gain a good standing for themselves and great boldness in the faith that is in Christ Jesus.

The Mystery of Our Religion

14 I hope to come to you soon, but I am writing these instructions to you so that, 15 if I am delayed, you may know how one ought to behave in the household of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and bulwark of the truth. 16 Without any doubt, the mystery of our religion is great:

He[g] was revealed in flesh, vindicated[h] in spirit,[i] seen by angels, proclaimed among Gentiles, believed in throughout the world, taken up in glory.

Footnotes:
  1. 1 Timothy 3:1 Some interpreters place these words at the end of the previous paragraph. Other ancient authorities read The saying is commonly accepted

  2. 1 Timothy 3:1 Or overseer

  3. 1 Timothy 3:2 Or an overseer

  4. 1 Timothy 3:2 Gk the husband of one wife

  5. 1 Timothy 3:11 Or Their wives, or Women deacons

  6. 1 Timothy 3:12 Gk be husbands of one wife

  7. 1 Timothy 3:16 Gk Who; other ancient authorities read God; others, Which

  8. 1 Timothy 3:16 Or justified

  9. 1 Timothy 3:16 Or by the Spirit

New Revised Standard Version, Anglicised (NRSVA)

New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicised Edition, copyright © 1989, 1995 the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Now according to the National Catholic Reporter

Allot of organizations, reformations including the Church of God In Christ model themselves after the catholic church in attire and ordinance

https://www.ncronline.org/blogs/parish-diary/four-easy-steps-take-become-bishop

Four easy steps to take to become a bishop

There are four common steps. (Does not include getting on the internet and filling out a online bishops form lol)

First, apprentice yourself out to a bishop as his personal secretary.

Secretaries learn the day-to-day life of a bishop and the inner workings of the diocese. Of course, the actual day-to-day work of a bishop's secretary is not very priestly or pastoral. They drive the car, pack the bags, make the plane reservations, keep the calendar and basically act as a "man Friday."

Once, when a priest secretary to our archbishop was made a bishop, our parish secretary asked me quite innocently, "Do they always make the archbishop's valet a bishop?"

"Yes," I said, "That's pretty much how it works."

Second, get an advanced degree, preferably in canon law.

Knowing the rules of the church is the sine qua non for a bishop. Degrees in liturgy or dogma are nice, and maybe once in a while they are useful, but the real gold standard is canon law. All Vatican diplomats study canon law. It is the instruction book on the machinery of the church.

Third, get a Roman connection. This step is essential.

For Americans, this often means that you either go to the North American College in Rome for your seminary or graduate work. There are other ways to get a Roman connection, such as getting a job in some Vatican office, serving in the Vatican diplomatic corps, working for some pontifical charity, or maybe even getting yourself assigned to the Vatican embassy in Washington, D.C. (Both Cupich and Cardinal Timothy Dolan worked there.) Or you could work at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' headquarters in Washington.

Fourth, keep a sharp eye on the weather in Rome. Knowing which way the wind is blowing in Rome helps adjust your own sails.

Here is more from

How Bishops Are Appointed:

http://www.usccb.org/about/leadership/appointing-bishops.cfm

Introduction

The ultimate decision in appointing bishops rests with the pope, and he is free to select anyone he chooses. But how does he know whom to select?

The process for selecting candidates for the episcopacy normally begins at the diocesan level and works its way through a series of consultations until it reaches Rome. It is a process bound by strict confidentiality and involves a number of important players – the most influential being the apostolic nuncio, the Congregation for Bishops, and the pope. It can be a time consuming process, often taking eight months or more to complete. While there are distinctions between the first appointment of a priest as a bishop and a bishop's later transfer to another diocese or his promotion to archbishop, the basic outlines of the process remain the same.

Key Terms

Apostolic nuncio The pope's representative to both the government and to the hierarchy of a given nation; a key person in deciding what names are recommended to the Congregation for Bishops for possible episcopal appointment.

Auxiliary Bishop A bishop appointed to assist a diocesan bishop. Whether in a diocese or archdiocese, his title is bishop.

Coadjutor A bishop appointed to a Catholic diocese or archdiocese to assist the diocesan bishop. Unlike an auxiliary bishop, he has the right of succession, meaning that he automatically becomes the new bishop when the diocesan bishop retires or dies. By canon law, he is also vicar general of the diocese. If the diocese is an archdiocese, he is called coadjutor archbishop instead of coadjutor bishop. In recent years, a growing number of U.S. bishops in larger dioceses or archdioceses have requested and received a coadjutor in their final year or two before their retirement, in order to familiarize their successor with the workings of the (arch)diocese before he has to take over the reins. This minimizes the learning curve of a new bishop and eliminates completely the possibility of the diocese being vacant following the old bishop’s retirement.

Congregation for Bishops A department of the Roman Curia, headed by a Cardinal. The head of the Congregation, called the "prefect," is presently Cardinal Marc Ouellet, a Canadian. Among the congregation's responsibilities are moderating all aspects of episcopal appointments; assisting bishops in the correct exercise of their pastoral functions; handling ad limina visits (regular visits to Rome by bishops every five years); and establishing episcopal conferences and reviewing their decrees as required by canon law. Its membership consists of approximately 35 cardinals and archbishops from around the world. Current U.S. members of the Congregation are Cardinal William J. Levada, Prefect Emeritus of the Vatican Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, and Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl, Archbishop of Washington.

Diocesan Bishop Pastoral and legal head and representative of a diocese.

Province

A territory comprising one archdiocese, called the metropolitan see, and one or more dioceses, called suffragan sees. The Code of Canon Law spells out certain limited obligations and authority that the metropolitan archbishop has with respect to the dioceses within his province. The United States is divided into 33 ecclesiastical provinces.

Terna A list of three candidates for a vacant office, including the office of bishop.

Stage 1: Bishops' Recommendations

Every bishop may submit to the archbishop of his province the names of priests he thinks would make good bishops. Prior to the regular province meeting (usually annually), the archbishop distributes to all the bishops of the province the names and curricula vitae of priests which have been submitted to him. Following a discussion among the bishops at the province meeting, a vote is taken on which names to recommend. The number of names on this provincial list may vary. The vote tally, together with the minutes of the meeting, is then forwarded by the archbishop to the apostolic nuncio in Washington. The list is also submitted to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB).

Stage 2: The Apostolic Nuncio

By overseeing the final list of names forwarded to Rome, the apostolic nuncio plays a decisive role in the selection process. He not only gathers facts and information about potential candidates, but also interprets that information for the Congregation. Great weight is given to the nuncio's recommendations, but it is important to remember that his "gatekeeper" role, however, does not mean that his recommendations are always followed.

For Diocesan Bishops
  • After receiving the list of candidates forwarded by a province, the apostolic nuncio conducts his own investigation into the suitability of the candidates.

  • A report is requested from the current bishop or the administrator of a diocese on the conditions and needs of the diocese. If the appointment is a replacement for a diocesan bishop or archbishop about to retire, consideration will be given to the incumbent's recommendations. Broad consultation within the diocese is encouraged with regard to the needs of the diocese, but not the names of candidates.

  • The report is to include the names of individuals in the diocese with whom the Nuncio might consult and how to contact them.

  • Previous bishops of the diocese are consulted.

  • Bishops of the province are consulted

  • The president and vice president of the USCCB are consulted.

  • If the vacancy to be filled is an archdiocese, other archbishops in the United States may be consulted.

  • At this point, the nuncio narrows his list and a questionnaire is sent to 20 or 30 people who know each of the candidates for their input.

  • All material is collected and reviewed by the nuncio, and a report (approximately 20 pages) is prepared. Three candidates are listed alphabetically – the terna – with the nuncio's preference noted. All materials are then forwarded to the Congregation for Bishops in Rome.

For Auxiliary Bishops
  • A diocesan bishop must justify to the apostolic nuncio his need for an auxiliary bishop. This is easier if he is requesting a replacement for a retired or deceased auxiliary.

  • The diocesan bishop prepares the terna, or list of three candidates, for his requested auxiliary and forwards it to the apostolic nuncio.

  • The nuncio then conducts his own investigation of the priests on the diocesan bishop's terna, sending the names to Rome with a report and his own recommendations.

  • On average, this part of the process may take two to six months.

Stage 3: Congregation for Bishops

Once all the documentation from the nuncio is complete and in order, and the prefect approves, the process moves forward. If the appointment involves a bishop who is being promoted or transferred, the matter may be handled by the prefect and the staff. If, however, the appointment is of a priest to the episcopacy, the full congregation is ordinarily involved.

A cardinal relator is chosen to summarize the documentation and make a report to the full congregation, which generally meets twice a month on Thursdays. After hearing the cardinal relator's report, the congregation discusses the appointment and then votes. The Congregation may follow the recommendation of the nuncio, chose another of the candidates on the terna, or even ask that another terna be prepared.

Stage 4: The Pope Decides

At a private audience with the pope, usually on a Saturday, the prefect of the Congregation for Bishops presents the recommendations of the Congregation to the Holy Father. A few days later, the pope informs the Congregation of his decision. The Congregation then notifies the nuncio, who in turn contacts the candidate and asks if he will accept. If the answer is "yes," the Vatican is notified and a date is set for the announcement.

It often takes six to eight months—and sometimes longer—from the time a diocese becomes vacant until a new bishop is appointed.

Now According to the church of God In Christ:

The Church of God in Christ Wiki

http://thechurchofgodinchrist.wikia.com/wiki/Bishop

A bishop (from the New Testament Greek ἐπίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained or consecrated member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of high authority and oversight. As for bishops of the Church of God in Christ, according to the 1985 Church of God in Christ Manual, a bishop is an ordained and consecrated clergyman who presides over a certain diocese (or as it is called in the Church of God in Christ, a jurisdiction) of several churches and is in charge of officiating over worship services in his own or other churches that he supervises. A bishop also oversees and supervises every spiritual matter of religious worship and service that goes on in their jurisdiction. The Presiding Bishop is one of the main and highly authoritative figures of the Church of God in Christ, because whoever holds the office and position is in charge of supervising all religious matters and affairs that take place in the COGIC. According to the Church of God in Christ manual, a bishop is supposed to carry out his duties justly, fairly, and most importantly according to the Word of God. If he does not, he can be removed from his position as a bishop and be suspended from the church clergy.

A Bishop's Mitre The Mitre, the international symbol of a Christian bishop in the Roman Catholic Church A bishop (from the New Testament Greek ἐπίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained or consecrated member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of high authority and oversight. As for bishops of the Church of God in Christ, according to the 1985 Church of God in Christ Manual, a bishop is an ordained and consecrated clergyman who presides over a certain diocese (or as it is called in the Church of God in Christ, a jurisdiction) of several churches and is in charge of officiating over worship services in his own or other churches that he supervises. A bishop also oversees and supervises every spiritual matter of religious worship and service that goes on in their jurisdiction. The Presiding Bishop is one of the main and highly authoritative figures of the Church of God in Christ, because whoever holds the office and position is in charge of supervising all religious matters and affairs that take place in the COGIC. According to the Church of God in Christ manual, a bishop is supposed to carry out his duties justly, fairly, and most importantly according to the Word of God. If he does not, he can be removed from his position as a bishop and be suspended from the church clergy.

History

When the COGIC was first founded in 1907 by Bishop Mason, when he organized the church into a more episcopal denomination, he and his assistants who would later be known as the "General Board", created the title of Bishop as a title for high-ranking clergymen in the church who would preside over jurisdictions. Although the congregations of the COGIC denomination were not as widely spread out across the nation as they are now, the number of people joining the denomination was increasing exponentially. So Bishop Mason created the title of bishop as a title and an office for clergymen who would serve as "governors" for the jurisdictions of the COGIC. When the COGIC first started out, there were less than 20 bishops in the Church of God in Christ, but now there are over 600 bishops in the COGIC who preside over the many jurisdictions of the church that are spread out all across the world.

COGIC Bishops in Modern Times Every four years, a general election is held in which the bishops of the Church of God in Christ meet in the General Assembly (the combined legislative and judicial bodies (and partially executive) of the COGIC that has the duty of upholding the bylaws and doctrines of the church) and vote for twelve bishops who will become members of the General Board. They also vote for one of those twelve men to be elected to the office and position of the Presiding Bishop. According to the COGIC Manual, only bishops, pastors, ordained elders, state Women's Department supervisors, two (2) district missionaries and one (1) lay delegate can vote in the COGIC General Elections. See page 9 of the COGIC Manual

COGIC Bishops when they are ordained to the office of bishop are obliged to choose one woman (who is a missionary) to be the supervisor of the Women's Department of their jurisdiction. Once that woman is appointed, they are given the option to serve for life or to retire.

Succession amongst bishops in the COGIC, is based on the Constitution of the Church. It is noted that the Presiding Bishop, along with the General Board, appoints the Jurisdictional Bishop. The Constitution does note that Pastors of the Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction for which a Bishop will be appointed, can recommend to the General Board the name or names of elders to be considered for the position of Jurisdictional Bishop. This recommendation from the pastors in modern times, often takes the form of a "poll" of pastors of the respective jurisdiction by the General Board. All General Board decisions regarding Bishops and Jurisdictions must be ratified by the General Assembly. When a successor to the office of Bishop is approved, he is subsequently formally consecrated to the Office of Bishop in the next International Holy Convocation.

Vestments worn by COGIC Bishops When bishops are ordained, as they attend church services (especially special ceremonies at different COGIC churches) they are given the option of wearing a clergy suit or "Class A" garments. The clergy suit is composed of a black suit (black suit blazer and pants), a clergy collar, and a scarlet or purple clergy shirt. If a bishop is on the General Board or is the Presiding Bishop, he must wear the scarlet clergy shirt if he wears the clergy suit.

Bishops can also wear their "Class A" vestments. The Class A vestments are composed of a purple or scarlet cassock (the color depends on the rank of the bishop in the church), a white surplice , a purple or scarlet chimere , a purple or scarlet tippet, a gold pectoral cross , and a clergy collar worn around the neck. There are some services where bishops are obliged to wear their "Class A"

vestments.

Lets just see who is going up and who really qualifies, this is no time for games! These are sols that are having people put over them!

#becomingabishop #bishopcogic

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